FF-1106 Rolling Disc On Inclined Plane

Experiments

  • Demonstration of the law of gravity on an inclined plane.
  • Influence of the mass of a body on its acceleration.
  • Determination of the moment of inertia on rotating masses by performing a rolling test.
  • Determination of the moment of inertia by performing a pendulum test.
  • Influence of the moment of inertia of a rotating mass on its angular acceleration.

Specifications

  • Investigation of inertia in rotational motion.
  • Proof of the law of falling bodies.
  • Experimentally determine the mass moments of inertia.
  • Rolling experiments on an inclined plane with height adjustment and three-point support.
  • Goniometer and spirit levels ensure precise alignment.
  • Measure the time and the acceleration distance.

Description

This apparatus is designed to calculate the moment of inertia of disc through rolling action. In this apparatus, discs of various materials are used to calculate moment of inertia. A metal carrier with a three point support is used as an inclined plane for the experiment; the different rotating masses are rolled down this plane.

The inclined plane can be precisely aligned using integrated spirit levels and three bolts. The angle of inclination is adjusted using an adjustment bolt. A ruler is integrated directly into the inclined plane for measuring the distance. The steel rotating masses each have self centering conical pins.

This benchtop unit enables basic experiments to be performed on dynamics and is ideal for laboratory experiments. A metal carrier with a three point support is used as an inclined plane for the experiment; the different rotating masses are rolled down this plane. The inclined plane can be precisely aligned using two integrated sprit levels and three bolts.

The angle of inclination is adjusted using an adjustment bolt and is indicated by the built-in inclinometer. The inclinometer uses the plumb line principle. A 1000mm ruler is integrated directly into the inclined plane for measuring the travel. The steel rotating masses each have self-centering conical pins. Using a separate pendulum block the moment of inertia of the rotating masses can be determined by swinging.